Posts tagged with " 2.7.1"

WordPress Upgrade to 2.7.1

Monday, 23/02/2009 ≅11:35 ©brainycat

As you may have noticed, I've made some changes to the site recently. I've gone to one post per page and fixed nearly 40 UI bugs in the last few days. Behind the scenes, I've also upgraded to WordPress 2.7.1 from 2.6.2. I never upgrade to x.0 releases. I'll let everyone else find the bugs and get the release that works properly out of the box.

So far I don't see what the big deal about 2.7.1 is. Aside from breaking some plugins (or obfuscating them so well I can't figure out where the new UI for them is), and having a glacially slow admin interface (yes, I installed gears) I really don't see any difference. Performance on the blog side seems about the same.

I would rather the admin side be a set of APIs, to which developers can create their own look/feel. I don't want whiz bang AJAX menus. I want quick and easy, and save my CPU cycles for other stuff.

Upgrading was seemless. I upgraded on my local development server, and found no problems. I updated all my plugins, still no issues. I pushed the updates (pulled from SVN?) to my development environment on my hosted server, still no difference. Updating the site was painless. I really wish the developers would tell me exactly what SQL queries are entailed during the "Updating your database..." phase. Additionally, the "automatic upgrade" option in the Tools menu scares me. I have my entire site (sans database, which gets backed up regularly elsewhere) in version control, so I download tarballs and integrate them into my trunk. I can forsee users who aren't using source control and are lazy with their backups going into hysterics when the update blows up their site. Hehehehe.

Here's my procedure for updating my site:

  1. tag a release in SVN
  2. backkup my database via phpMyAdmin and keep the file locally
  3. login to the shell on my hosted server (it's a shared box, but my server process is all mine)
  4. cd ~/DOCUMENTROOT
  5. svn checkout http://SVNURL/path/to/tag
  6. cp ./OLDVERSION/.htaccess ./NEWVERSION/
  7. cp ./OLDVERSION/wp-config ./NEWVERSION/
  8. ln -s ../media ./NEWVERSION/media
  9. login into my hosting provider's admin UI and change the SERVERROOT to ~/DOCROOT/NEWVERSION
  10. wait a few minutes while the records update and the processes respawn
  11. verify new installation

The whole process takes about 10 minutes, and it has a builtin backout plan: change SERVERROOT back to the last version, and reload the database if that blew up as well.